Park Road 19, "Clarence Hotel" currently The Park

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"The Park", 19 Park Road
"The Clarence Hotel", 19 Park Road in 1975
"The Clarence Hotel" 1904
"The Clarence Hotel" 1905


Road: Park Road, Teddington

Property: 19, "The Park" formerly the Clarence Hotel, Park Road

Listed grade II in 1983 as a building of architectural or historic interest; the listing description is:

'Mid C19, 2-storey large public house. Nine bays wide (2:5:2). Centre bays stand forward and have higher first floor. Stock brick with stucco dressings. Entablatures at first floor and parapet level. Centre bay door and window openings have elaborately enriched dressings.'

This substantial building dates from 1863 and was built on the site of another pub – the Greyhound Inn – which itself dated from 1730. It was also known as the Clarence Arms Inn and briefly the Guildford Arms, named in both cases after the occupants of the nearby Bushy House. The Duke of Clarence was the future King William IV.

In 1823, the post office was here and letters were dispatched daily at "quarter before eight and a quarter before three in the afternoon." The style of the building is distinctly neo-classical French with its imposing first floor and segmental pediments over the windows.

The 1871 census (page ref RG10/866/720/2), 8 years after the hotel was built, gives two brothers - James and Robert Hale - as the hotel keepers at the ages of 28 and 27; they have 5 employees: house keeper, barmaid, cook etc.; they are still running the hotel in 1891 (ref. RG12/617/124/11) with three servants noted, and by then both have families. James has 2 daughters and a son, whilst Robert a daughter; no wives are recorded in the census however. In 1901 (ref. RG13/673/30/1) the hotel was run by a William Wickes - described as 'hotel proprietor' - with his family, and a much larger staff of 10, two of which were foreign-born - from Germany and Austria..'

 THE PARK HOTEL – TEDDINGTON  from Alan Winter in the Twickenham Tribune Dec 8,2018;
"19 Park Road has been the site of various dispensaries of ale and alcohol for nearly 300 years.

Originally an ale house called the Greyhound back in 1729, it became known as the Guilford Arms in 1795. In 1823, the post office was on this site and letters were dispatched daily at "quarter before eight and a quarter before three in the afternoon." The style of the building is distinctly neo-classical French with its imposing first floor and segmental pediments over the windows. The pub was renamed after the occupant of the nearby Bushy House; the Duke of Clarence was to become the future King William IV. The Clarence Arms Inn is shown as trading there in 1860 before being completely re-built in 1863 and later becoming the Clarence Hotel. It temporarily closed for major refurbishment in 2000 and is now known as the Park Hotel which trades as a pub, a restaurant and a hotel. The Park is a grade II listed building. The first of our Edwardian postcards shows the hotel as a working stables and of interest is the policeman on the other side of the road. About 60 years later in the 1970s there were still police officers keeping an eye on ‘The Clarence’ on a Friday and Saturday night as it hosted a very popular disco which attracted young people from miles around. I find the lack of traffic interesting. Of course motor vehicles in any numbers were still twenty or so years away but the road looks as if it is ready for them!"


The Historic England weblink is at:

http://list.historicengland.org.uk/resultsingle.aspx?uid=1357755

© Historic England 1952. The National Heritage List for England entry contained in this material was obtained on 15/7/13. The most publicly available up to date National Heritage List Entries can be obtained from www.historicengland.org.uk


This page is part of the Directory of Buildings of Townscape Merit (BTMs) and Listed Buildings in Teddington assembled by the Planning and History Groups of The Teddington Society. Click on any photo for a higher resolution version. Copyright for the material on this page rests with the contributor.